George Lucas Educational Foundation

Play & Recess

Learn about the importance of unstructured play, the research behind it, and tips on how to make time for it—even in high school.

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  • Encouraging Dramatic Play in the Early Childhood Classroom

    A collection of picture books to guide dramatic play and foster students’ literacy and social and emotional skills.
    Kristin Rydholm
    720
  • The Importance of Recess

    Recess is often sacrificed to make room for more academics. The research says that’s a big mistake.
    203.8k
  • More Than a Dozen Ways to Build Movement Into Learning

    Physical activity that amplifies learning can have a powerful effect on retention and engagement—it’s also fun.
    1.7k
  • 9 Brain Breaks for Elementary Students

    To boost creativity and productivity, take time out for movement, calming exercises, and a healthy dose of fun.
  • A Hop, Skip, and a Jump

    The possibilities for creating a sensory path to give students a movement break are endless. Here’s what schools across the country are doing.
  • An illustration of a little boy riding a paper airplane to the moon

    What’s Lost When We Rush Kids Through Childhood

    The author of "The Importance of Being Little" on the costs of our collective failure to see the world through the eyes of children.
    39k
  • Child swinging on a swing

    Time to Play: More State Laws Require Recess

    Unstructured playtime is making a comeback in schools as frustrated teachers, parents, and advocacy groups demand legislative action.
    44.8k
  • Inspiring Creativity With Blocks in the Early Childhood Classroom

    These picture books for young learners encourage them to grow their social-emotional and collaboration skills as they build with blocks.
    440
  • Eight young students are outside on top of a metal, geodesic dome at a playground, looking down.

    Longer Recess, Stronger Child Development

    With an hour-long recess, elementary schools can help children develop through increased creative play, authentic SEL, and adequate physical regulation.
    40.9k
  • Why Recess Should Never Be Withheld as Punishment

    Experts argue that recess is necessary for a child's social and academic development, and skipping it as punishment for misbehavior or to accommodate more seat time is a serious mistake.
    11.3k
  • The Science Behind Brain Breaks

    Research shows that breaks can provide more than rest. Use them to boost creativity, cognitive function, and social skills.
    10.2k
  • Play Will Be More Important Than Ever in Preschool This Year

    Play can help the youngest students transition to in-person learning and develop skills they need for the future.
    3.5k
  • How Children Process Grief and Loss Through Play

    Young children will likely process the tumultuous events of 2020 in the only way they know how—through play. Here’s how adults can be supportive.
    7.8k
  • Play-Based Activities That Build Reading Readiness

    Preschool teachers can use these activities to promote six early reading skills even as the kids enjoy themselves.
    3.3k
  • The Building Blocks of Dramatic Play

    More than costumes or props, young kids need time and space to work out the basics of how to collaborate—and their bickering is a key tool in that process.
    3.2k

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George Lucas Educational Foundation